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that critics say will deepen europe's dependence on russian gas. president putin was on hand as they began digging for the south stream pipeline. >> to augment supplies already flowing into germany. europe already receives 40% of its natural gas from russia. german investment and technology will be playing a key role in the project. >> it is a victory for russian president vladimir putin. they looked on as the first segments were welded together in western siberia. it is three weeks since bulgaria gave the go-ahead for the project. the last transit country to do so. >> this project has the political support of all partner countries. all have signed the contracts and taken their investment decisions. the pipeline will move huge amounts of gas. 63 billion cubic meters. >> that is how much gas sell stream is to move once it is completed by 2019. it is being routed from the black sea to italy and bypasses the current transit country, ukraine. moscow has argued with kiev over fees and gas prices for years. a feud that has often cut off gas supplies to western europe. >> south stream could soon
hikes, europe's grand experiment with taxing the rich more is falling apart, especially in france and britain. and here at home, california and new york are passing through the 50% tax rate barrier. is anybody looking at how tax hikes fail the test of economic growth? >>> back here in the u.s., could it be michigan which used to call itself the worker's paradise union state is now moving towards new anti-union right-to-work legislation and it looks like it's going to pass? but first up, budget talks resume between speaker john boehner and president obama today. with just 25 days to go, let's keep tabs on where we stand. reports of a conservative backlash against speaker boehner simply not true. he has the solid support of his leadership and the rank and file. but there is concern among some in the gop that they are at risk of becoming the party for rich people while president obama and democrats stake their claim on the middle class. and my tax rate flexibility with higher -- here's what the president said earlier today. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevent pr
the way europe has been growing, we will have a small consolidation, such as the small consolidation proposed by the president. if you want to have the kind of growth that i hope we can have with a bigger consolidation, that one is being proposed by speaker boehner. >> thank you. >> i would like to focus on something that is probably more of interest to the economists and ordinary people. let's talk about ratios. what i heard you lay out, dr. zandi, was more of an ideal situation. they get you at roughly at $3 trillion. deficit-reduction over the course of 10 years. you went on to add the $1.20 trillion over last year's negotiations on the debt ceiling. the negotiations over last year's debt ceiling -- the new number would really be 1-1. that is not actually my question. i want to get to now. we have looked at the president's offer. we haven't found any spending reductions at all. we found the $1.6 trillion tax increases. the stimulus spending,we saw the extension of the unemployment insurance, which is an increase in spending. the delay in the spending cuts whatsoever. do you think
america will benefit and have a positive economic gain if we export lng offshore to europe, and or asia and to other countries that need our gas. melissa: we have so much natural gas unlocked as a result of fracking, the problem is, intellectually, emotionally we can never wrap our heads on exporting energy. we're sure we have to keep it all for ourselves. do you think we can get over the hurdle, and that the president and washington in general can get over that hurdle? >> that is a great point, melissa. what you're describe something protectionism. you're right, america has a history of wanting to protect our assets and i think that's great but i think the scenario we're looking at now is unprecedented. america has so much natural gas i think we can fuel our transportation, power generation and domestic energy needs and actually export the surplus. it could be a cake and eat it too scenario. within eight years or now seven years as we turn into the new 2013 year it could be $50 billion economic impact to this country. so we're tripping over dollars to try to save pennies. weemight be a
and melissa lee. questions remain about the internals. europe is reacting to a miss on german industrial production and some reports at least that some ecb members favored a rate cut yesterday. our road map will go like this. that puzzling jobs number beating virtually every wall street estimate as the labor department says sandy had only a minimal effect. is it true a clean number and what are conspiracy theorists saying. >>> a comment hastings made last july. what does it say about s.e.c. rules and whether they are out of date. >> mcdonald's will post same store sales on monday gets an upgrade to buy taking the forecast to a street high after surveying franchisees. we begin with november jobs number. 146,000 nonfarm jobs added last month above forecast of 80,000. october and september payrolls were revised lower. unemployment rate fell by 0.2 to 7.7. that's the lowest in four years. the dip occurring mostly because more people stopped looking for work and were not counted as unemployed. as for hurricane sandy, the labor department says the storm did not substantively impact the novembe
with christine lagarde from the imf. i asked about the reforms that were taking place in europe. i asked, would any of these reforms be taking place without europe being in a fiscal crisis mode? her answer was, absolutely not. unless the revolver is at the temple of the politicians with the finger on the trigger, they're not capable of summoning the collective will to tell the people that represent that they need to take steps to resolve a problem and will cause disappointment and pain to do so. my experience in the years i have had in politics was exactly that. we never would have gotten what we did in 2011 without the threat of defaulting on our debt. to think that we could put a structure in place today that perhaps we would all be comfortable with in terms of solving our long-term problems and be assured that 10 years or not that congress would not have modified that dozens of times to the response of into joints who are banging on the door and saying this is to develop much pain, we could hardly sustain a policy for months around here, let alone 10 years. if you want to fix the long-term s
. there is a terrible economy with 26% unemployment highest in europe, almost no job opportunities for young people frequentenly lead toro riots in the streets. here is leading democrat is suggesting cutting spending too quickly is a real problem. >> the european community now is concerned about all the austerity. there are many, many things you can do to reduce debt. but still have a stimulus aspect of the economy. >> experts though say europe's us aer the city a drag on the economic growth because it relies too much on taxation while failing to reign in the expansion of government. that would seem to back up a republican theme in the fiscal cliff argument. >> if we raise taxes on the top two rate, a million small businesses who employ 25% of the work force it will cost us over 700,000 jobs and reduce economic growth, lower take home pay and those things. that is a bad scenario. >> the league negotiator on the republican side of the table facing mr. obama says raiding taxes on upper -- raising taxes on upper income americans is not going to fix the problem that the country is facing. >> even the p
. very chilly in winnipeg. minus 15 degrees on your friday. finally let's go over to europe. severe weather continues in the eastern half of the mediterranean countries. turkey will see the heaviest rain today. wet and windy conditions for the british isle. watch out for icy conditions. rain will spread into italy into tomorrow. lots of blue and white indicating near sub zero temperatures. here is the exthe eended foreca. >> thanks for joining us. to wrap up this edition of "newsline" we go where an annual event is underway to commemorate a tragic earthquake that occurred there. this 270-meter illuminated archway is made of 200,000 lightbulbs. it started in 1995 to mourn the victims of the great earthquake of the same year and to pray for the rebuilding of the city. the theme of the 18th event is the bond of lights. paintings by children in kobe in northeastern areas of japan struck by last year's earthquake and tsunami are on display. >> translator: this gives me a dream for the future. >> the festival runs through december 17th.
europe. we have not had a lot of problees. seems like the greeks are kind to getting things. >> the last few days, europe markets have been pretty strong. as you said, a sleeping giant. cheryl: i do not want to see anything change. it has been nice. gentlemen, thank you. i appreciate it. great floor show today. uncertainty seems to be the norm in washington these days. last year you have the debt ceiling convey. congress had trouble putting together a deal. now the u.s. may be heading for the fiscal cliff. what does that mean for you and your investments? we have the jobs report today for a brief moment. we weren't worried about the fiscal cliff. now, we are back. what do you make of it? >> the jobs report was okay. there are some signs of very modest improvement in jobs. the good news is we have not really lost momentum and i will put that in the victory column. from a very short-term perspective, it is the fiscal cliff that is on everyone's mind. consumer sentiment is starting to decline. that suggested everyone seems to be focused on the fiscal cliff. when you are focused on uncertain
your vision should be for adapting the paa that's in europe into asia? because leaders here have said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> well, you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it wasn't designed to be in a long-term ballistic missile defense architecture. it still has benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the bmd capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have sbx in that role has diminished over time because other capabilities are mature enough to be able to not have to have it. as far as the ability for the intercepters to be productive, i think you have to look across all of technologies that we've pursued in bmd and recognize the that the significant technological challenges that have been associate with the that program and really i think you have in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've d
of the year. we have so much uncertainty in washington. we do have slowing economies in europe and in the u.s. >> right. david, what do you say right now? break the tie for us. >> break the tie. in the near term, there's an epic tug of war between extremely aggressive monetary easing and just total disdain for what they're doing in washington on tax and regulatory policy. in the near term, the fiscal cliff prevails. in the longer term, the fed will prevail. there's so much mistrust on stocks that i think that still can be a positive catalyst for stocks relative to traditional bonds over the next 12 months. >> i'm going to push back a little bit on that. >> i'm going to break the tie in ralph's favor. >> david, i want to push back a little bit on that. in terms of -- like, is the fed really that much of a factor these days now in terms of keeping the market afloat? >> absolutely. >> it's not losing its bang for its buck? >> it's not as powerful as it was in the fall of 2008 or even 2010, but when you consider that, u.s., long bonds, 1.5%. short-term interest rates, zero. negative on an infla
a session low, 0.4% as problems in europe's periphery continue to weigh. a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake has struck across japan's northeastern coast. the quake rocked buildings as far as tokyo according to reports. u.s. geological survey said there was no threat in the wider pacific ocean. the yen has been rising to a session high before we got details of that. and right now, you can see dollar-yen at 82.39. 82.17 before that happened. some safe haven in-flows into japanese currency. if there was going to be a wave in terms of tsunami that was going to hit, it would have happened around five, six minutes ago and she had yet to see any specific drop or change in the sea level. so we'll hope that that continues on that particular way. atomic power says no irregularities seen at its nuclear plant. operations are normal after the quake. so we'll keep our eyes on that. and we'll see if there's any further reaction, as well. hurricane sandy is expected to have put a big department in the jobs report out at 8:30. expected to rise by just 80,000. it would be the smallest job growth in five mont
are relatively unaffected by the debt woes in europe. >>> as if to back up the ad bcs's projection, japan's economy remained out of steam in october. the latest key economic indicator fell for the seventh straight month. the cabinet office says the coincidence index of the economy ticked down 0.9 points from september to 90.6. the index tracks the current state of the economy and reflects activities like industrial output and employment. government officials trace the decline to the global economic slowdown. they said shipments of tvs and some other products suffered during the month. they downgraded their assessment of the economy to worsening for the first time since march 2009. >>> the operator of the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant has released information about the doses of radiation workers were exposed to at the plant. tokyo electric power company had earlier submitted the same data to the world health organization in march. more than 20,000 people including subcontractors took part in emergency operations at fukushima daiichi between march 2011 and the end of january this year. th
a family of eastern european immigrants. they were mostly born in europe, all of my grandparents were born there. when my grandparents came here, they were older people. english was not something they were very interested in. my grandparents spoke russian, romanian, yiddish, and german. a sixth language? no way. they learned english, but they were never comfortable with it and they forgot it as soon as they could. my parents didn't speak english either, but they were going to live their lives in this country so they've learned it. they always spoken with a heavy accent and was something that was always a struggle for them. as they got older, they didn't want to do it anymore. my father spoke his last words in yiddish. we are born here, my native english speakers. i think you can mostly understand me. what i think about technology, i see a parallel and my family because i think about my parents, my parents have really become my grandparents' generation. if technology is something they did not want to learn. boy, would she like to forget it. she hates technology. we have really become a skil
numbering your money back from europe being 30% you might make it 10%. a lot of money would come back to the u.s. and it would be good for the economy. dave: don't mean to pouu water and your idea because i agree with you it would be a great idea to have a tax holiday we have it ministrations people want from the chief economic adviser of the president on down with the administration and they say no way they are going to do this. would give the any optimism it might be done? >> people need revenue. this is positive for revenue. the money sits over cease and the u.s. treasury gets none of it. if you declare this tax holiday the money produces revenue in nd the u.s.. the change of administration at some point. dave: are you hearing anything about this? we ask the administration specifically about this, they say we won't let it happen. >> that is what we heard. they are not going to let it happen but it would be great if they did because of what has already been pointed out. we need to spur this economy and of the fiscal cliff developed and small-businesses our hits we have to have growt
will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate jig there are a lot of reasonable proposals being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenu
and grow when the entitlement culture become permanent like europe. of the last one. you are a young man surrounded by people the same age. when you come out and talk like you are talking now what is the reaction? >> a lot of the marston's. they never heard it before especially from teachers across the country. they never heard the tenets of capitalism in our schools and that is what our group turningpoint usa is doing. i go to lecture halls and high school band is about talking about the morality of capitalism versus the morality of government dependency and i truly believe young people want to be free. young people want to make their decisions and because of that there is hope. stuart: if you ever come in your queue set on the set with us because we like what you have to say. good stuff indeed. thank you. you want to add anything to that? you are the ceo when you hired these youngsters. >> i agree. stuart: do you seeethat entitlement mentality in the work force, the young work force that is coming in? >> i see and that mentality, i don't agree with the president on his position on enti
about this? >> sure. absolutely. so we do have patents in the u.s. and in asia, africa, and europe. but in addition to that we have an incredible team of engineers and scientists who are not only developing cook stoves but a whole range of energy technologies. and so where we really see our role as a company is in providing personal scale energy access that's affordable and safe and reliable. >> talk about affordability. how much is this? >> these stoves are $130. >> okay. now, you are in brooklyn, new york. but you don't make these here, right? >> we don't. >> you have a factory -- >> we manufacture -- we manufacture in asia. and then -- but it's all based on the designs and the engineering of the team right here in new york. >> now, i've looked at this in the videos. how long does it take me to make a pot of tea? >> four minutes. >> it takes us four minutes to boil a liter of water. that's it. >> four minutes? >> four minutes. >> well, guys, look, it is omg. i'm thrilled you that came here. this is jonathan cedar. okay? and john levy. biolite's chairman and ceo. thank you so much
are most proud of is the fact that we still import more product from europe than we do from china. so you are talking about artisan product, product that has a story to it. that's special. you don't see that in retailing in america. >> reporter: stores like sur la table are expected to be one of the few bright spots in an otherwise lackluster holiday season for merchants. in fact, some experts think home goods will be hotter than toys this holiday season. ibm projects home goods will see the strongest sales growth this year, up over 6%. that's far more than toys and electronics. >> you may ask yourself, why home? we think home is up because of a lot of things-- things like the changing demographic of the home itself. there's a stat that says that 41% of those between 25 and 29 are living back at home. >> reporter: but there also a second reason. >> we think that this holiday people are buying what they need vs. what they want. >> reporter: which had me wondering what's on jack schwefel's wish list this holiday season. it wasn't this $5,500 coffee maker. >> there are some new knives that i
minister. it happened at a meeting of the coganization for security and cooperation in europe, known as the o.s.c.e., and margaret brennan is covering for us tonight. margaret. >> reporter: well, scott, officials familiar with those talks say the russians now think that bashar al-assad may not survive the war, and they want to have influence in syria if his regime falls, or if he loses control of the chemical weapons inside of his country. u.s. officials are particularly concerned that those weapons dould fall into the hands of an al qaeda affiliate active within syria. r: pelley: so what's coming next? >> reporter: well, it's a start to a new round of diplomacy. the russians have refused to meet for months, but this is not nabreakthrough. the russians are signaling they're willing to help with the political transition, but they are still officially supporting haad. secretary clinton says the russians have refused to give him asylum. oher countries have offered, but so far, he is not negotiating his exit. assad has vowed to fight to the death. >> pelley: margaret, thank you. when the
next guest on "wall street journal" reporter who reports on in europe and their work rules. from london, what do they get that we don't? >> european workers have the right to and protection of gainful unemployment. the minimum guaranteed staycation is 20 days paid not including weekend, additional time off , holidays. at france it starts at 25 per good european court of justice added on another to give a workers the right to to a vacation to over or give back. >> for instance it used the for two weeks for your christmas holiday and use brain drain gold and the last eight-- you are laid up that means they automatically go into your sickly youth then you could have the vacation do over to make up for those days that you weren't that sec or hurt. john: if you say i have they cold? they have to give you that back? >> if it is dead doctor's note to to say she got the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying eve
earlier and in the use of rubber bullets and i lived in europe for a long time and i can safely say that all weapons are harmless and tasers are no exception. even though they are disguised as a less lethal option and amnesty international reported that 500 people in the u.s. died since 2001 in california alone. we know that mentally ill people are particular risk but so are others, such as elderly, pregnant woman, and people with heart problems and drug users. i believe that there needs to be another alternative for crisis intervention teams and one without weapons. thank you. >> hope, as the founder, i have been for 40 years, and needless to say in that time i have encountered many people in crisis, and i am 76 years old and i am still there, and i hope that we will not put tasers in the hands of our police officers or anyone else especially those dealing with people in crisis. and i have dealt with many people in crisis, on the street, in our facilities and in our safe house for the homeless, addicted prostituted women who are trying to change their lives. i shutter to think what
casualty rates in europe. and so when chet comes back to san francisco, those people who signed no no were looked upon as cowards. they were traitors. they sat out the war where these other people died. everyone a friend, an uncle or somebody they knew who had died, lost an arm, or was killed in service. chet comes back and he is literally spit on by his own community. so my protagonist is someone who is an ex-jazz musician, who spent his adult years playing with black groups, he comes back to san francisco at a time when japan town is still sort of unraveling from this sort of who lives here, who doesn't live here, and he wants to find japan town again, find his own sort of home while at the same time around him his own community is looking at him as if he is a traitor. so as he says and used to say in the play, i'm on the outside of the outside. my country thinks i'm a criminal, my own community thinks i'm a traitor. how does he sort of find home for himself in america given that kind of a set up? so that's where the stories all kind of converged and my central character, where he came f
the neighbors of syria and our allies in europe -- some of which have now been ahead of us like france, britain -- that we will focus in on this immediate, really potentially disastrous threat that assad will use chemical and biological weapons. >> you said a moment ago that iran is our most dangerous enemy. >> right. >> if so, how far should we be willing to go to prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons? >> well, you know, i just echo what everybody has said right up to president obama, that it's unacceptable for us to allow iran to become a nuclear state, that containment is not an acceptable alternative for all the reasons we know. i think that's absolutely right. it changes the whole balance of power in the middle east, it emboldens the terrorists like hamas and hezbollah that are agents of the iranian government. it probably, unless we're strong, leads some of our allies in the arab world to begin to accommodate to iran, and it's a threat to most of the rest of the world, including us. so, you know, the sanctions have been unprecedented, they're having an effect on the iranian economy
and making the german economy the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but under this policy germany has made tremendous advances. there is one country in the world that is 100% solar power as of last month. cca cannot possibly do what they need done. the word -- you can boil this whole argument down to one question, one word and that is "inevitability". we are running out of the oil. we are drowning in our own waste. we need to stop burning oil and the way you could do it is putting a couple hundred solar panels on each house in san francisco. this was indirectly mentioned in the guardian editorial but they don't say it and it's because they don't understand it. it's important to understand what being done in germany and other countries around the world because by doing this they're creating a massive cash flow to homeowners in these countries and it's an investment that the homeowners are glad to take
in 2009, marina and the diamonds released her debut album "the family jewels." it won her an mtv europe music award. >> the welsh singer released her sophomore album that went straight to number one. welcome. >> you've got songs that make you want to get up off the couch and dance like the one you're going to perform for us. you've been clumped up with great artists, lawrence and the machine, katy perry. how does that make you feel as a newcomer, at least on the stage? >> generally annoyed. >> really? >> yeah. >> why? >> it's astounding how much i've been compared to other artists and completely different artists. sometimes it's a compliment. i think it's getting to a point where -- >> you're your own girl. >> i hope i am. >> which of those are you a fan of? >> i love florence. i love katy, i went on tour with her. yeah. i love anyone who is great. >> what are you going to perform for us? >> it's called "how to be a heartbreaker." >> marina and the diamonds, take it away. ♪rule number one ♪ is that you gotta have fun ♪ but baby when you're done ♪ you gotta be the first to run
" reporter who reports on in europe and their work rules. from london, what do they get that we don't? >> european workers have the right to and protection of gainful unemployment. the minimum guaranteed staycation is 20 days paid not including weekend, additional time off , holidays. at france it starts at 25 per good european court of justice added on another to give a workers the right to to a vacation to over or give back. >> for instance it used the for two weeks for your christmas holiday and use brain drain gold and the la eight-- you are laid up that means they tomatically go into your sickly youth then you could have the vacation do over to make up for those days that you weren't that sec or hurt. john: if you say i have they cold? they have to give you that back? >> if it is dead doctor's note to to say she got the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety haza
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
in europe? what about here and our lack of action in washington? >> obviously, i am very concerned. it shows a lack of confidence for investors. get behind closed doors in a serious way. it is ridiculous that the grover norquist pledge is taken by people we need to raise revenue. the president has to lead and not follow from behind on cutting the growth in entitlements. when people say we are going to cut spending, no, we are going to cut the growth of spending. medicare, medicaid, social security and other discretionary things in the budget. the gap is too wide. other people have pointed out we need revenue at 18.5% of gdp. we need expenditures at 21%. another point that i would like to make is the consumer has pretty much tapped out. if you look at nominal gdp it was up in the last quarter, personal income is only up 3%. that is a bad sign people are just saving and in solving credit is going back up. installment credit is up 11.7% year over year. a lot of these factors do not bode well. dagen: thank you for shaking me up this morning, scott. it was great to see you, as always. terrific in
in washington. everywhere else, go to paris, london, europe, the arab world, you read their press, and everybody knows, or everybody criticizes or accuses the obama administration as being a partner as pushing or helping the morsi government, and before that, the muslim brotherhood. it's a well-known reality. only in the hallways of the washington, political establishment, the question should be why? why did the obama administration from day one from tahrir square, rather than teaming with the youth, women, middle class, labor, and he sided with the muslim brotherhood, and that question basically, if we answer that question, we would know what would be the future of the policy in egypt. lou: eric, you cautioned against trusting morsi from the outset, and now, it appears, we are trying to persuade russia to end their support for assad. how effective do you think that ever will be? >> i think it will be very uneffective, and i'm afraid we waited way look on syria. 30,000 people have been killed. now reports of gas loaded on to bombs to be dropped # on them, and i think we really have to be very co
on the bloody battlefields in europe. and came back the most decorated and exercised something that was very important. they did it for their family certainly, but for the greater good because they loved america. they sacrificed themselves and many many perished on those fields and that is the kind of situation we are faced with now and those republicans can't seem to get it. they are so bull headedly when theed to their philosophy. we need to raise taxes to meet the crisis. and they would rather plunge down that cliff and plunge us into another economic catastrophe because the sequester is going to cancel the military contracts that we have and that means unemployment for many many years ahead. and all it takes is everybody rallying together and sacrificing a tiny bit. during what we enjoyed during the clinton jeers. lots of jobs being created. and cutti inting taxes creating has never been proved to be true. with the middle class maintaining the tax cuts, they are going to be spending money and creating jobs.
it to europe, other countries we can travel, so people in this country can travel to those countries knowing they're not going to be handicapped any more than they are by facilities. why would a republican vote against such a deal? you first and then john. >> there's a lot of pressure from the right on this. there's the paranoia from the u.n. >> explain it. >> the notion that the u.n. is going to come in and tell us what to do. the fact of the matter is this treaty raises the world to the standard of the u.s. doesn't require the u.s. to change its standards at all and doesn't in any way give the u.n. power to do anything in this country. but i think it's -- all you have to do is say u.n. and people on the right get very exorcised. rick santorum helped lead the opposition to this treaty. i think he's out of step with the american people, out of step, by the way, on this tax cuts for the rich stuff. you know, bobby jindal said today, and i thought it was remarkable, we're in danger of becoming the party that defends the rich, anti-medicare, anti-social security, and there's no future in that k
and jobs. to work in transport sector -- and it's very, very important for europe, also for our investment. >> the e.u. hopes that the space sector will account for 20% of its gdp by the year 2020. the u.k. space agency has been $2 billion for the european space agency programs. the space agency already contributes 9.1 billion or $14 billion to the u.k. economy. for europe investing in space is investing in the future. >>> medical marijuana is already legal in several states in the united states. now, voters in washington state and colorado have ok'd the recreational use richard branson says yes. >> simply proposed with the harder drugs is do what portugal has done and that is, you know, let the state set up clinics throughout america that if you have a drug problem, you go to that clinic. give them the methodone until they're ready to come off, and when they're ready, you use a drug clinic that costs one-third of the price of a prison medical record to get them back into society. >> go to cnn.com to read sir branson's opinion piece about ending the war on drugs. sxwlirchlgts how nasa is p
. >> driving while high, while legal research shows more drivers are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana effects coordination and judgment. >> one of the first and most important being reduced ability to divide one's attention. >> pot is far left debilitating than argue many argue. new canadian study say those who drive within three hours of smoking pot are twice as likely to cause a crash. >> another we see driving under the influence of marijuana reduce the ability to perceive time and distance. >> how much is too much? >> i don't absolutely feel that we are on uncharted territory. i know we are for a fact on uncharted territory. >> severe level for pot in washington state where marijuana is now legal. the limit is 5 nano grams per blood sample. equal to alcohol. >> because we are still early on in the research stage, it's very difficult to determine whether or not that five than gram standard will change. similar to how the dui standards have evolved over the years. >> the problem is heavy users, though not impaired, can test positive weeks after smoking. also,
that is europe has settled down into some sort of permanent no-growth mode and yet almost every one of the stock markets is doing better than ours. come on, washington, that's ridiculous. how can the markets in switzerland, netherlands, sweden, france, germany do better than us? how is that possible? because of you, washington. it's because of you. we've been kept back all because of you. second, before our politicians stepped in with their intransigence and anger, we were about to have an explosion in earnings. retail was as strong as i've seen it in a decade, autos back incredibly robust. and that's just the beginning. because all the pent up demand. we're running short of office buildings, shopping centers, apartments, homes, these are the hiring sectors, all this blather about helping the small businessman of subchapter "s" for private and middle class, you want to help them? give them a deal, any deal, just get out of our way for heaven sakes. our country is starting to get so competitive, again, that businesses building things over there now want to build them here. tim cook tells brian wi
of the neighbors of syria and our allies in europe, some of which have now been ahead of us, that we will focus in on this immediate really potentially disastrous threat of chemical and biological weapons. >> you said a moment ago that iran is our most dangerous enemy. if so, how far should we be willing to go to prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons? >> i just echo what everybody said. it's unacceptable for us to allow -- to become a nuclear state. containment is not an acceptable alternative. i think that is absolutely right. it changes the balance of power in the middle east. some of our allies to begin to accommodate. and it's a threat to most of the rest of the world. the sanctions, unprecedented so i think we have to the make sure that our threat of military actions, if they don't take down their nuclear equipment is credible. i'm still not sure it is. they have to believe that the u.s. will use our immense power to the civil the program if they don't. >> make one comment directly pertaining to the overall theme here. starting a long time ago, years ago our sanctions regime should n
-- if you can't force workers to join them, outlawed a whole range of tools that workers in europe and other places use to organize, right. there are two sides of the act and all these pieces of legislation. >> i don't know. if i think if your argument is good enough your union is strong and make a better deal for your workers you're going to join people to join. >> it's always better to free ride. >> we've also expanded the ability of businesses, of corporations to inva against having union organizing. >> and intimidate. >> dessertify unions and intimidate people. what capital wants is the cheapest possible work it can buy. >> look at walmart. a great case. walmart does not pay its workers a living wage, not the minimum, $25,000 a year for going by federal poverty measurements and if they did they would lift hundreds of workers -- >> retail wages used to support a lifestyle. >> you can understand where governor snyder is coming from. sees businesses locating in indiana because of this. >> michigan has a amazing job creation and business relocation record in the last ten years. >> if you jus
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